All aboard the Esperanza with Greenpeace

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Last Sunday I had the absolute pleasure of being invited amongst other volunteers to board one of Greenpeace’s iconic research boats; the Esperanza.

Launched in February 2002, the Esperanza is the largest vessel in the Greenpeace fleet. And Esperanza – Spanish for “hope” – is the first Greenpeace ship to be named by our supporters.

Everyone was so excited as we boarded the city cruise boat taking us over thames to the Esperanza, which floating near Tower Bridge. Some Greenpeace volunteers had come as far as Durham to take the opportunity to explore the ship.

Firstly, we were taken to the heli hanger and we warmed up with some ‘erbal tea because it was bladdy freezing. Then we were given a presentation on the upcoming plastic pollution campaign by Greenpeace’s anti-plastics champ, Louise Edge. It was pretty terrifying to learn that plastic use is set to double in the next 20 years, and that…

By the time a baby born today reaches its mid-30s, there will be more plastic in the oceans than fish.

Louise wanted our opinions on the campaign, what it should involve/focus on, and what issues it might face. Some of the points discussed included:

  • We must be able to clearly explain how plastic ends up in the seas and oceans when talking about countries like the UK where we have fairly well-contained and regulated waste systems.
  • We must push for better knowledge and exposure of what can and cannot be recycled dependent on where you live in the UK, and if not, why not.
  • The idea is to roll this campaign out internationally, so as to set an example for the wider world. SE Asia is the worst for plastic pollution.
  • Biodegradable not the solution because this term just means the plastic breaks down quicker; the materials are still pollutants.
  • We agreed that we should work closely with organisations such as Surfers Against Sewage and the Marine Conservation Society on this campaign.
  • We must focus on pressurising multinationals to take responsibility and put budget aside for infrastructure in developing countries to ensure that they recycle, manage and contain the volume of plastic in their waste system efficiently.

Secondly, Frank – who was a member of the Arctic 30 and has worked for Greenpeace for 27 years – talked to us about the Esperanza’s work with the Dirty Tuna campaign. It was used for research, but also to expose and act on illegal fishing practices in Asia. Some of Frank’s stories sounded terrifying, involving pirates and gun-wielding fisher criminals. Apparently they discovered that 20 illegal Fishing Aggregation Devices (FADs) are dropped into the oceans per day, and there are approximately 150,000 in the oceans at one time.

Lastly, we were given a tour of the ship’s lower decks, upper decks, engine rooms and helm. Here are some photos of the mighty Esperanza, please excuse the quality not being great…

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Before the Flood: 5 Easy Changes to Make a Big Difference

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As you may well know, Leonardo DiCaprio’s (*swoon*) highly-anticipated climate change documentary – Before the Flood – was released last week and is available to watch for free on the National Geographic’s YouTube channel until midnight tonight… I realise that if this is the first you’ve heard about it, then it is very short notice but DROP ALL YOUR PLANS. This is THE most important film you will watch this year. In fact, it’s possibly THE most important film you will have watched in your life so far.

I believe that anyone who really cares about our planet and the natural environment will feel a pivotal ‘tipping point’ at the end of a film. A realisation that…

Your ignorance means your contribution to the destruction of our planet.

I had that very feeling, that ‘no turning back’ feeling, after I watched 350.org’s Do the Math in July last year. I reached the end of the film, had a gentle sob and a hard think, then I decided to finally make some life changes.

So, if you have just watched Before the Flood and are feeling overwhelmed as to how you can help reverse Climate Change (and trust me, I have felt that feeling of hopelessness many a time!), then have a read of these 5 Easy Changes to Make a Big Difference:

  1. Switch your energy supplier to a renewable one, such as Ecotricity. This might sound like a big palaver but I’ve been through it recently and Ecotricity do all the leg work for you. This is also one of the easiest ways to pull your money away from fossil fuel companies, and you won’t find the bills to be much more expensive.
  2. Do some research into where your money is invested, and make sure it’s invested in green projects. Have you ever thought about where your pension is being spent? It could be being invested in fossil fuels…
  3. Check where your bank invests its money, and take action if need be. Did you know that Barclay’s are funding fracking projects? Well, to be fair, it’s not something they’re going to be shouting about. Move Your Money is a fantastic website, campaigning to stop banks from investing in dodgy dealings. The top 5 worst banks for investment in fossil fuels are HSBC, Barclays, Lloyds Bank, RBS and Santander. Move Your Money makes it easy for you to email the bank directly, threatening to switch banks if they don’t divest.
  4. Reduce your meat consumption. As Before the Flood highlights, around about 10-12% of total US greenhouse gas emissions come from the production of meat. We’re not America, true, but we can help offset their damages. Research led by Oxford Martin School finds widespread adoption of vegetarian diet would cut food-related emissions by 63% and make people healthier too. (The Guardian)
  5. Get active! Join an activist/volunteer group with organisations such as Greenpreace, BP or not BP, or Friends of the Earth. There are all sorts of fun campaigns to get involved with, to suit everyone, all over the country.

 

I do all 5 of the above (practice what you preach and all that) and it makes me feel a lot more positive about the future, and I hope that I’ve inspired some people along the way…