Eco Interview: Rhys Ellis, fashion designer and recent Birmingham City graduate

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A couple of weeks ago, I attended Graduate Fashion Week to see my hugely-talented sister’s collection in all its glory, for the first time, paraded down the catwalk. It was a hedonistic combination of feminine rose-gold, ethereal tulle and striking black leather strappings. Take a look at her website, her name is Alice Elizabeth Brown and she’s going to be the next big thing in fashion – you heard it here first.

Whilst Alice’s work was obviously the best and without-a-doubt my favourite, I was also blown-away by Rhys Ellis’ collection which was made entirely from recycled Nespresso capsules. Of course, I loved the environmental angle of his collection and wanted to know more about the thought-processes behind the designs – so I asked him a few questions…

Rhys Ellis Fashion Designer Nespresso Capsules

 

I understand that your collection was made out of Nescafe Nespresso capsules… what was the creation process? 

The creation process was extremely repetitive and time consuming. Before the process actually started, I had to collect the used Nespresso capsules from across the UK and Italy and then clean them. Once the capsules were emptied and polished, I could then begin creating the material. The material was created by using the chain mail technique which made it suitable for me to drape around the female form.

Wow, that sounds long… just how long do you think this took? How many hours did you spend on each item?

I think this has been the most popular question asked. The material took on average 144 hours to create per dress. As for creating the garment, I would be taking a wild guess as I am constantly changing and refining each design so the dresses didn’t stop changing until they walked onto the runway.

Did you encounter any extra problems using these materials, as opposed to a generic fabric?

No, as the material was made using the chain mail technique, it made it possible to create shapes and movement which a generic fabric wouldn’t allow.

Rhys Ellis Fashion Designer Nespresso Capsules

How did you manage to source so many used capsules?

I had to network with hotels, bars and small businesses across the UK and Italy. Alongside the businesses helping me, word of mouth had a huge impact on the contribution of used coffee capsules. In the end, around 30 families were sending me their coffee capsules.

What gave you the idea for your collection?

When I was living in Milan, I met a women that used Nespresso capsules to create ear rings. I then decided to develop this idea into a material.

Has this project made you think more about your impact on the environment?

Of course, when you compare the amount of capsules I’ve used within the collection compared to the amount used around the world. It’s a horrible thought to know that these small capsules are going to end up in a landfill, left to damage our environment.

I understand you came across some pretty shocking facts about the waste associated with Nespresso capsules. What did you find out?

Nespresso capsules produce methane, also know as CH4, which is a greenhouse gas with more than 20 times the global warming capacity of carbon dioxide. Also, a quote in The Grocer (supermarket trade magazine) said ‘one in two people in Britain said that they believed “coffee pods are very bad for the environment”, 22% of those asked, said they owned their own machine.

What’s next? What are your plans for the future?

I am currently developing ideas for the Autumn/Winter collection. My plans are to create under my own name, searching for a studio and a platform in which I can showcase my collections.

 

 

More astonishing Nespresso stats (taken from Rhys’ portfolio):

  • Each outfit contains 4,000-5,000 Nespresso capsules with the total collection reaching 30,000 recycled capsules with an estimated value of £870,000 (Rhys is still receiving capsules and he reckons that their total original worth now reaches beyond £1m!)
  • Nespresso states that 12,300 capsules are used per minute globally, which is 6.4 billion a year. Even if half are being recycled, that means that over 3,200 metric tons of aluminium is being sent to landfills annually.
  • 75% of Britons drink coffee, 48% drink coffee pods.
  • In the last year, more than £112 million worth of coffee capsules were sold in the UK, up by a third since 2014.
  • Analysts expect sales to treble 2020, at which point coffee capsule sales could overtake those of tea bags.

 

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